Company logos on AR clothing

#2
ArcWear.com has tested logos that were made from natural fibers but not arc rated. Some did burn when exposed to an arc of greater than the rating of the garment, but the size of the logo will ultimately dictate the possibility of a burn. Having the company name embroidered directly onto the shirt is acceptable, in fact we at e-Hazard.com have this on our arc rated clothing. We generally do not recommend, large cotton backing tabs or polyester on which the logos are embroidered and then sewn into the shirt. In summary, keep it brief (employee name, company name) and sew it on directly or use screen printing. There are FR Inks not but not really any testing to show it as superior in arc flash.
 

Hugh Hoagland

Moderator
Staff member
Dec 30, 2016
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Louisville, KY
www.arcwear.com
#3
ASTM F1506 just recommends that logos be limited in size. This is primarily due to some burns being recorded from sweat underneath logos. I've never seen a logo increase injury from ignition or melting onto a worker but the sweat burns have occurred but have been limited to 1-2 degree burns.

OSHA holds the employer responsible that logos do not add to injury for a worker so it is up to the employer to determine logo safety.
 
Oct 24, 2018
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#4
The ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard provides design guidelines and specifies the photometric requirements, minimum amounts of component materials, colors, and placement to create garments and headwear for the purpose of enhancing the visibility of workers. The selection of components and classes of apparel should be made based upon what is appropriate for the hazard and with the safety of the worker in mind.
 
#5
The ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard provides design guidelines and specifies the photometric requirements, minimum amounts of component materials, colors, and placement to create garments and headwear for the purpose of enhancing the visibility of workers. The selection of components and classes of apparel should be made based upon what is appropriate for the hazard and with the safety of the worker in mind.
Not all logos are high-visibility in which case ANSI 107 would not apply. We have tested fabric that meets ANSI 107 that did not meet ASTM F1506 - it looked like a winter bonfire afterwards! Both standards are important when applicable, however, in electrical arc flash environments ASTM F1506 is the first consideration against the thermal hazard.